Women’s History Found: NYC

A recent visit to New York city once again proved that women’s history is everywhere, you just have to look for it!

Woman’s Christian Temperance Union Sites

The Cooper Union, constructed in 1859. Across the street in the 1870s was Bible House, the home of the American Bible Society. The Woman's Christian Temperance Union had its first National Headquarters there beginning in 1879. Frances Willard became the 2nd President of the WCTU that year. the Ny HQ was home to the WCTU in its early formative years.

The Cooper Union, constructed in 1859. Across the street in the 1870s was Bible House, the home of the American Bible Society. The Woman’s Christian Temperance Union had its first National Headquarters there beginning in 1879. Frances Willard became the 2nd President of the WCTU that year. The NY HQ was home to the WCTU in its early, formative years.

The Hotel Empire, near Lincoln Center. Frances Willard died in 1898 at this location, in an earlier building of this hotel, at the height of her worldwide fame. A memorial was held at the Broadway Tabernacle nearby and a funeral procession made its way by train from New York to Chicago, with thousands coming out to pay their respects.

The Hotel Empire, near Lincoln Center. Frances Willard died in 1898 at this location, in an earlier building of this hotel, at the height of her worldwide fame. A memorial was held at the Broadway Tabernacle nearby and a funeral procession made its way by train from New York to Chicago, with thousands coming out to pay their respects.

Evanston women’s history found at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Mirror made by Eda Lord Dixon, who grew up in Evanston, studied art in Chicago, and took up metalwork seriously once she moved to Riverside, California in 1909.

Hand mirror made by Eda Lord Dixon, who grew up in Evanston, studied art in Chicago, and took up metalwork seriously once she moved to Riverside, California in 1909.

A Young Mother, by Bessie Potter Vonnoh, 1896. A casting of this sculpture is in the EHC collection, a gift from Charles Gates Dawes to his wife Caro.

A Young Mother, by Bessie Potter Vonnoh, 1896. A casting of this sculpture is in the EHC collection, a gift from Charles Gates Dawes to his wife Caro.

Tiffany floor lamp, ca. 1904-1915. A similar lamp is in the EHC Collection, purchased by Caro Dawes for the house. Almost all Tiffany lamps were designed and created by women who worked for Tiffany Studios.

Tiffany floor lamp, ca. 1904-1915. A similar lamp is in the EHC Collection, purchased by Caro Dawes for the house. Almost all Tiffany lamps were designed and created by women who worked for Tiffany Studios.

Sites in or near City Hall Park

Memorial to Jane Addams, at New York City Hall Park. Given in 1935 by the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, of which Addams was a founding member, in honor of her 75th birthday.

Memorial to Jane Addams. Given in 1935 by the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, of which Addams was a founding member, in honor of her 75th birthday.

Memorial to Marie Curie, from the Polish children of New York city, 1934. In honor of her 67th birthday.

Memorial to Marie Curie. From the Polish children of New York city, 1934, in honor of her 67th birthday.

Though hard to see under the scaffolding, this street (Park Row) was named in honor of Elizabeth Jennings, who, in 1854, insisted that she, as a black woman, had the right to ride on any available streetcar. At the time, streetcars in the city were segregated. Jennings won the court case in 1855.

Though hard to see under the scaffolding, this street (Park Row) was named in honor of Elizabeth Jennings, who in 1854 insisted that she, as a free black woman, had the right to ride on any available streetcar. At the time, streetcars in the city were segregated. Jennings won her court case in 1855.

This site (in a previous building in what was then called Printing House Square) was home to the editorial offices of The Revolution, a newspaper published by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony from 1868 to 1872. Its primary focus was women's rights, but it also covered related topics of importance in that day.

This site (in a previous building in what was then called Printing House Square) was home to the editorial offices of The Revolution, a newspaper published by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony from 1868 to 1872. Its primary focus was women’s rights, but it also covered related topics of importance in that day.

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